Annexation of Puerto Rico: ‘Little Giants’ Trick Play Explained

This article is a summary of the YouTube video ‘The Annexation of Puerto Rico: ‘Little Giants’ Definitive Trick Play Explained | The Ringer’ by The Ringer

Written by: Recapz Bot

Written by: Recapz Bot

AI Summaries of YouTube Videos to Save you Time

How does it work?
The movie “Little Giants” features a game-saving trick play, the annexation of Puerto Rico, inspiring other underdog teams in movies.

Key Insights

  • The greatest trick play in football movie history is the annexation of Puerto Rico from the movie "Little Giants" (1994).
  • The Little Giants, coached by Rick Moranis, face the Cowboys, coached by his brother, who is played by the grandpa from Modern Family.
  • The Cowboys are depicted as the bad guys, and Rick Moranis bets ownership of his gas station on the game against the better team.
  • The Giants rally from being down 21 points at halftime to tie the game late.
  • With four seconds left and starting 99 yards from the end zone, the Giants execute the annexation of Puerto Rico trick play.
  • The play involves a fumble and a series of laterals to confuse the opposing team.
  • The Giants' decision to attempt the Fumble Ruski for a 99-yard gain is not very smart, but the Cowboys' defense also fails by aggressively defending the line of scrimmage.
  • The Fumble Ruski play is against NFL rules, but it is frequently used in football comedies as a game-saving trick play.
  • Other movies, like "The Longest Yard" (2005) and "The Longshots," have also used the Fumble Ruski play.
  • The annexation of Puerto Rico in "Little Giants" inspired other underdog movie teams to use similar trick plays for last-second game winners.

Seedless Grapes: Are They GMOs?

Android Hacking Made Easy: AndroRAT Tutorial

Andrew Huberman’s Muscle Growth and Strength Workout Plan

AMG Lyrics – Peso Pluma

Alex Lora: Rising Passion

Ahsoka Recap: Season 1 in Brief

Transcript

What makes a great trick play? It’s more than just a believable decoy. The best ones leave legacies and inspire copycats for generations. We remember their names.

And so today, we’re focusing on what I believe to be the greatest trick play in football movie history, the annexation of Puerto Rico from the 1994 movie, Little Giants.

Here’s the situation. The Little Giants, coached by Rick Moranis, are playing against the Cowboys, coached by his brother, who was played by the grandpa from Modern Family. You can tell the Cowboys are bad guys because the movie takes place in the 1990s and the grandpa from Modern Family named his team after the Dallas Cowboys. Go, boys, go, boys, win, win, win!

Rick Moranis’ team is made up of players who were cut by the grandpa from Modern Family. But despite this, Rick’s character still decides to bet ownership of his gas station on a game between his team of misfits and the Modern Family grandpa’s far better team. You’re on. Fine. Okay.

Unsurprisingly, the Giants head into halftime down by 21, but this would be a pretty boring movie if the better team wanted a blowout, so the Giants rally to tie the game late. Is that physically possible? After making a key fourth down stop at the goal line, they take over 99 yards from the end zone with four seconds to go. No team has a game-99-yards-in-four-seconds play. No team, but the Little Giants, that is.

What kind of play you got for this situation? How about the annexation of Puerto Rico?

So how does it work? Newby tells John Madden that it was inspired by a play his Raiders used in Super Bowl XI. Then he pivots, fakes, chucks the big bomb halfway down the field to our hopefully still wide-open tailback. Based on the description, we can imagine the play unfolding with a quarterback running to one side of the field as part of a slow-developing fake and a running back going deep on a wheel route.

In reality, the play looks absolutely nothing like that. In fact, there’s no throw at all. The trick is correctly identified by opposing coach Grandpa from Modern Family. Fumble Ruski, Fumble Ruski!

The Fumble Ruski is one of the oldest trick plays in football, supposedly invented by John Heisman. Nebraska used it in the 1984 Orange Bowl when offensive lineman Dean Steinkuhler ran 19 yards for a touchdown. Basically, the entire offense pretends to execute a play to one side of the field while the quarterback places the ball on the ground, allowing another player to pick it up and run in the opposite direction. Reverse! Reverse!

The Cowboys are fools and devote most of their effort to tackling Becky Icebox O’Shea. No ball. But it’s Rudy Zoltec, the Giants’ flatulent offensive lineman, who actually has the football.

Problem is, the Fumble Ruski is great for short yardage situations, but it’s not so great for gaining 99 yards. The annexation of Puerto Rico has the Giants’ fattest, slowest player running the entire length of the field. Zoltec doesn’t even reach the 50. While getting tackled, Zoltec flings the ball over his head, probably the worst thing anyone could do at any point in any play. But the ball winds up in the hands of a teammate, and after two more laterals, the Giants score.

The Giants’ decision to run a Fumble Ruski 99 yards from the end zone was dumb, but not as dumb as the Cowboys’ decision to vigorously defend the line of scrimmage on a play where their opponents needed to gain 99 yards. Great job, Coach Grandpa from Modern Family.

You won’t see their real New York Giants attempt the Fumble Ruski since the play is against NFL rules, but you will see it whenever an overmatched team in a football comedy needs a game-saving trick play. And trust me, overmatched teams in football comedies always need game-saving trick plays.

The team of inmates in the 2005 remake of The Longest Yard used the Fumble Ruski to get elderly Burt Reynolds a touchdown. Taking the play from the old Nebraska playbook, the Fumble Ruski! And a Fumble Ruski gets Ice Cube’s niece to the playoffs in the long shots.

With the annexation of Puerto Rico, the Little Giants didn’t just save Rick Moranis’ gas station and beat the Grandpa from Modern Family. They gave every movie underdog a blueprint for last-second game winners.

So remember, if you’re coaching a heavily favored defense in a movie, and there’s one play left, watch out for the Fumble Ruski. Hollywood scriptwriters just don’t have that many ideas for trick plays.

This article is a summary of the YouTube video ‘The Annexation of Puerto Rico: ‘Little Giants’ Definitive Trick Play Explained | The Ringer’ by The Ringer